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5 Things You Should Know Before Using a High-Output Alternator

1 wire Alternator

 

So you’re considering swapping out your stock alternator.

There are plenty of good reasons to make the leap to a high-output alternator, but you’ll need to do a little bit of homework first. Luckily, we’ve got smart friends to help us with our studies, so you can ace the topic. In conjunction with the alternator experts at Powermaster and MSD, we’ve compiled the five things you need to know before upgrading to a high-amp, or high-output alternator.

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The 2015-2016 5.0 Coyote is impressive by itself but fast is never fast enough!! 2017  Mustang Coyote GT features the Aluminator Ford 5.2 Voodoo Crate Engine series. The 5.2-liter Aluminator XS. It is Capable of producing  570+ horsepower. The 5.2 Ford Crate Engine Aluminator XS offers an aftermarket option. For enthusiasts looking for enhanced power train options.

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How does the Ford 5.2 Voodoo Crate Engine Aluminator XS differ from the engine in the GT350?  

Quite Significant, the Aluminator 5.2L XS combines all the FPP highest-performing. Coyote engine parts built since 2011 into one package:

  • Ford Performance Parts Cobra Jet 5.0L 4V intake manifold. Engineered for the Mustang Coyote cobra jet. Drag car  allows for an extra 20-25hp @ 8000 RPM
  • Ford performance Parts 65-mm Cobra Jet place aluminum choke body M-9926-CJ65. A dual 65mm throttle body that allows better flow over 5.0L or 5.2L choke bodies.
  • Ford Performance Parts with full CNC ported Ford 5.2 Voodoo Crate Engine cylinder heads with custom high lift (5.0L firing order). The camshafts allow better flow and the correct timing for a cross-plane crankshaft.
  • High-performance timing chain tensioners
  • Custom H-beam connecting rods & forged crankshaft. A cross-plane crankshaft is there to keep GT350 exclusive with the flat-plane crankshaft.
  • Includes 200 amp alternator

What do you see the intended use of this engine for Mustang enthusiasts?

This engine you can use as a crate engine in high-end resto-mod. Which builds or used as an engine upgrade for customers building track-day cars.

How did Ford Mustang go about developing the Ford 5.2 Voodoo Crate Engine Aluminator XS?

FPP engineers made slight modifications to work with the cross-plane crank.  As a result, the Aluminator XS is a capable, high-revving. One thing we set out to do with the new Aluminator kept the flat-plane crankshaft exclusive to GT350. Doing that means integrating a cross-plane crankshaft which was a challenge. Because it changes the firing order which impacts valve timing.

ALUMINATOR  XS 5.2 Ford CRATE ENGINE FEATURES

coyote-xtreme

Maximum Coyote Crate – 570+ Horsepower

  • 5.2 Ford Crate Engine – 317 cubic inches
  • 12:1 compression ratio (nominal)
  • Ford Performance 5.2L GT350 aluminum block
  • Mahle® hard anodized forged pistons with a low friction coating
  • Manley® H-beam connecting rods with ARP2000 bolts
  • Lightweight aluminum cylinder block features cross-bolted main bearing caps
  • Camshafts Camshaft kit – M-6550-M52A
  • M-6675-M50BR 12 quart rear sump oil pan features optimized oil drain back and windage tray to control oil and improve high-rpm performance
  • M-6600-50CJ High-Performance oil pump with billet steel gears
  • M-9424-M50CJ Cobra Jet tuned intake manifold
  • M-9926-CJ65 dual bore throttle body
  • M-9593-LU47 47 lb. fuel injectors
  • Ford Performance GT350 fully CNC ported aluminum heads M-6049-M52 & M-6050-M52
  • M-12A227-CJ13 high RPM pulse ring
  • M-8600-M50BALT alternator and mount kit
  • M-6P067-M50BK black coil covers
  • M-12405-M50A heat range zero (0) spark plugs
  • M-6731-FL820 oil filter


Flat Out: Inside the Shelby GT350 Mustang’s Engine

On the outside, it may look like your garden variety 5.0-liter. Mustang Coyote V8 found in the engine bay of a Ford Mustang GT or F-150, but appearances can be deceiving. “This is a new engine top to bottom,” said Eric Ladner, engine program supervisor at Ford. The list of changes and enhancements compared to the standard five-oh are exhaustive.

2016-ford-shelby-gt350-crankshaft

And as you’ve no doubt heard, the most important update of all is the crankshaft. Engineers eschewed a traditional cross-plane arrangement for one that’s flat. Rather than have the throws arranged at 90-degree intervals, the Shelby GT350’s are set 180-degrees. Flat-plane cranks are common in supercars like Ferraris. Where most performances are a top concern. But this is the first time Ford’s ever offered one and they’ve been mass-producing V8s for more than eight decades, ever since old Henry’s first flathead rolled out of the Rouge foundry in 1932. Ladner said, “Flat-plane cranks are in inherent lighter than their cross-plane counterparts.” This is because bulky counterweights are not required to balance them. But he also cautioned that crankshafts account for less than 15 percent of an engine’s rotating mass. So this is hardly their only benefit.

Beyond all of this, they “[allow] all the cylinders breathe the same,” said Christian. Which makes tuning the Ford 5.2 Voodoo Crate Engine much easier so they can run it closer to the ragged edge and get more power. Additionally, the Shelby GT350’s crank is made from forged steel for extra strength. It’s been “gun-drilled,” meaning holes have been punched through each of its throws to further cut mass. These openings also allow the adjacent bays inside the block to breathe together. So further reducing parasitic drag.

Bored and Stoked. Another major change in Mustang Coyote V8s is this power plant’s internal dimension. Giving it that extra 0.2-liters of lung capacity is a larger bore and longer stroke. The 5.2’s digits clock in at 94 millimeters by 93 millimeters. If you’re curious, a regular 5.0-liter measures 92.2 by 92.7.

2016-ford-shelby-gt350-intake-manifold

Instead of traditional cylinder liners, Shelby’s engine uses a plasma transferred wire-arc technology. Which saves a significant amount of mass. Additionally, its block is unique to this application. But the bore spacing and deck height are identical to a five-oh so the same machine tools you can use. The GT350’s engines will be assembled on Ford’s niche line in Romeo. Michigan; standard Mustang Coyotes are built in Windsor, Ontario.

These rotating components squeeze incoming air and fuel with a frighteningly high 12-to-1 compression ratio and, that’s ok. Thanks to exhaustive computer modeling the engine run just fine on 93 octane pump gas and it doesn’t even have direct injection. According to Ladner this feature “wasn’t necessary to meet our Ford performance targets,” plus DI systems are heavier and add cost.

Moving into the basement, this 350 Crate engine features a composite oil pan. So saves more weight, about 20 percent in fact. But it’s hardly a sump; it also contains an integrated pickup and windage tray, all in one unit. A higher-capacity oil pump ensures there’s plenty of lubrication at all times.

Breathe Deeply

Taking an elevator ride topside, the Shelby engine breathes through an 87-millimeter throttle-body, the largest Ford’s ever fitted, as well as an open-element air filter. Beyond this, there’s an all-new intake manifold. Its runners are both longer and larger in diameter than the ones found in the dearly departed Boss 302. This configuration bolsters torque production across the rev range and all told, 90 percent of peak twist is available at just 3,450 RPM.

The cylinder heads are where all the magic happens in modern engines and the 5.2-liter V8’s have received special attention. For starters, they’ve been strategically lightened and weigh about 6 percent less than the ones that cap off a standard Mustang Coyote block. Beyond this, the 350 Crate engine enlarged bores allowed for even bigger valves to help get copious amounts of fuel and air into the cylinders and speedily evacuate spent exhaust gasses once the mixture’s gone off.

Overall this 350 and Ford 5.2 Voodoo Crate engine is lighter than the 5.0-liter V8 on which it’s based and it puts out A LOT more power. And despite spinning beyond 8,000 RPM it has to meet the same durability requirements as any other Ford Mustang product. Accordingly, it will be backed by the same warranty, so don’t be afraid to tickle that redline.

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The development of supercharging has a long history, with surprisingly diverse applications. In 1860, the Roots brothers developed an air pump with a pair of meshing lobes for use in blast furnaces, and this type of blower found its way onto an engine designed by Gottlieb Daimler in 1900, making it the oldest of the various superchargers available.
Later on, veterans returning from WWII were inspired by the superchargers on fighter planes to hop up their hot rods. Today, this type of forced induction is now a staple of the performance aftermarket. There’s no quicker way to pull big power out of an engine than bolting on a blower. Gains of 30 to 50 percent and even more are not unusual, depending on the fuel delivery, octane and intercooling systems.
The principle behind supercharging is fairly simple: use a belt-driven pump to push more air into the cylinders so the engine can burn more fuel and generate more power. The devil’s in the details, though, since superchargers come in a variety of sizes and configurations. They also often require modifications to the intake, fuel and cooling systems, along with reprogramming the engine computer.
The basic types of blowers are Roots, twin-screw and centrifugal. As noted above, the Roots pulls air through a pair of meshing lobes (as does the twin-screw, but in a different configuration). While traditionally thought of as the least fuel-efficient type, the Roots has been refined by Eaton Corporation by using three- or four-lobe rotors, among other changes.

Roots Supercharger
These include twisting each rotor 60 degrees to form a helix, along with improved geometry for the inlet and outlet ports, reducing pressure variations, resulting in a smoother discharge of air for higher efficiency over traditional Roots superchargers.
The twin-screw type, offered by both Kenne Bell and Whipple, might look visually similar to the Roots type (both are usually mounted on top of the intake manifold), and is also a positive displacement unit (the amount of airflow pumped per rpm is fixed), but the internals are significantly different.
Using “male” and “female” rotors that turn in opposite directions, the twin-screw compresses the air between the rotors (rather than around the rotors, next to the blower case). The advantages of this design, Kenne Bell notes, include less turbulence, heat and friction, along with higher boost levels.

Kenney Belle SC

Kenne Bell introduced the twin-screw concept to Ford Mustangs in 1990, and employs it on a number of other engines, including both the GM LS V8s and the Chrysler Hemi. As mentioned, it’s a positive displacement design that produces the same cfm output and boost at any rpm — not just peak rpm. The 10 psi kit for the 2011 to ’14 Mustang GT increases power by 225 to 250 hp (approximately 20 hp/psi boost), depending on fuel octane (91 or 93).
Supercharger displacement choices are not limited to the smaller 2.3 OEM rotors. The much larger and powerful twin-screw sizes of 2.8, 3, 3.2, 3.6, 4.2 and 4.7 liters cover a power range of 725 to 1,800 hp. All superchargers utilize the same exclusive 4×6 lobe rotor concept that holds all those horsepower and track records.
The twin screw’s big, fat torque curve in the low and middle range, coupled to maximum peak horsepower and rpm, are the main reasons why the twin-screw concept has become so popular with both the aftermarket and OEMs.
In addition, to minimize supercharger inlet and boost restriction, Kenne Bell utilizes the industry’s largest throttle body (168 mm) and inlet system. This feature alone is worth 30 to 50 hp, the company claims. Also, the cooler air charge and patented Liquid Cooling ensure the lowest possible air charge temps for higher air density and thus more power. Finally, the twin-screw concept uses less engine power to drive it, resulting in lower parasitic losses and more power to the rear wheels.

The third basic type of supercharger, the centrifugal, is much smaller in size. It uses an impeller or compressor wheel spinning as fast as 50,000 rpm to draw air in and then force it out radially into a circular scroll. Since this configuration is similar to a turbocharger, the centrifugal supercharger has been described as a belt-driven turbocharger. (Turbos are driven by exhaust gasses.)

centrifugal-sc
One advantage of a centrifugal unit is in the package size, since it can fit under the hood as part of the accessory drive system, usually with no changes in the bodywork, except perhaps to redirect the airflow more efficiently. Another significant difference from positive displacement blowers is that the centrifugal unit provides less boost pressure at low engine speeds. (Which can be an advantage, since no piston modifications are required to prevent engine knock.)

On the other hand, since a centrifugal unit’s airflow is not fixed and increases with the square of its shaft rpm, it really comes alive at higher engine revs. So an engine with a centrifugal blower might feel stock at first, but gets bigger as you go faster. It sometimes seems like the speedometer rises quicker than the tach. Several popular makes of centrifugal superchargers include Paxton, Powerdyne, ProCharger, Rotrex and Vortech.
Which type of supercharger is right for your engine and vehicle? That will depend on a number of variables, but generally speaking, a centrifugal supercharger is ideal for a quick-revving, lighter vehicle with a manual transmission, while the positive displacement blower excels on a larger vehicle with an automatic transmission.
Both types can produce prodigious amounts of power, but at different areas of the power band. When looking at a supercharger, one shouldn’t be concerned only with peak horsepower numbers. Unlike race cars, performance cars aren’t driven frequently at the peak power range, so that can be a misleading figure.

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Whatever the type, all superchargers benefit from the use of an intercooler to reduce heat during compression. A decrease in air intake temperature (using either an air-to-air or air-to-liquid heat exchanger) provides a denser intake charge to the engine and allows more air and fuel to be combusted per engine cycle, increasing the output of the

engine. In addition, a cooler intake charge allows for higher boost levels without detonation for more power.
Of course, to keep up with a higher airflow, the fuel system needs to be modified. On an EFI engine, that usually means bigger injectors and reprogramming of the engine computer. The condition and mileage on the engine should be evaluated as well, to make sure the internals can withstand higher cylinder pressures. Also, when you add boost to an engine you are essentially adding compression. Regardless of supercharger style, there is a boost limit with 92- to 93-octane pump gas before detonation occurs, resulting in engine damage. So be wary of huge horsepower claims on pump gas, since they’re simply not sustainable within the detonation limits of most production engines.

 

Article Courtesy of Reincarmagazine.

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Development for the 3rd Generation engines by Chevy began after the short-lived LT1/LT4 engines which in the year 1992 to 1997 that failed to meet GM’s expectation.

General Motors then created Generation 3rd V-8 engine that has replaced a small-block LT1/LT4 platform.

After that Generation 3rd LS1 engines designed by GM showcased modern engine technology retaining traditional valve mechanical system. This engine was first appeared in Corvette 1997. After that whole series of high performance engines followed it.

why-LS-engines-are-too-awesome-1

In the last 10 years,

The LS engine exploded the market and we see them nestled between all show cars to all racing cars.

There are some reasons for this!

Their downward price and the market continued to make their transplants into all variety of vehicles with the fact that they are not simply going away.

So,

Whether you are planning to drop this magical engine into your legendary ride or you are buying a car for your college going child. I want to give a small introduction about them, focusing on the part that why LS engines are called GREAT in hot road culture!

why-LS-engines-are-too-awesome-2

What is an Engine??

It is just an air pump.

Air goes in, fuel added, mixture blows up and horsepower happens. Vroom-Vroom…

We all have heard some shorts about this technology on how engine works. But, the process is not quite easy as I have explained in one sentence. There are lots of processes undergoes inside the engine. And these

LS engines add quite more to advance these processes.

For starters,

The pistons are made up of alloys that are more stronger and more thermally stable than the cast iron pistons used in Generation 1 engines. These pistons are fitted with a thinner metal ring packs that reduces friction and also helps bore sealing.

Coming to the connecting rods, LS platforms use powder-forged design. They have cracked cap providing irregular mating surface allowing rod to align precisely with a large end, helping equalize bearing wear. They are very much stronger than production rods used earlier.

why-LS-engines-are-too-awesome-3

LS crankshafts are tough pieces with relocated thrust bearings have been proven to quadruple horsepower outputs.

So till now, I have established that the bottom end to this engine has got few things which are different from traditional small blocks. So, why to change SBC engine combo for few things when bottom end is less than $1000? It doesn’t make sense.

Now, here comes the master piece of LS engines…

The master piece of LS family engines is the cylinder head and valve mechanics components. This is what makes LS engines to deliver outstanding performance with few changes made.

The head of the engine is designed with a 15 degrees valve angle.

Research about a 15 degree small block head and you’ll come to know about the biggest win for the LS engines. In addition to improved geometrical valve design, the LS engines have replicated ports. Something different from Gen 1’s mirrored port configuration that have different runner sizing for cylinders 3 & 5, 4 & 6.

The new LS engine style allows every runner to be more symmetrical and gives every cylinder equal opportunity for airflow. The ported LS heads have proven to move over 300cfm of air.

The valve mechanism design for LS engines retains the pushroads. No more pinning rocker studs, or adding rocker girdles. The LS valvetrain is 7000 rpm capable right out. Engineers also integrated beehive springs which reduces overall valvetrain mass.

One more thing!

With LS, there’s no need to spend $1,000 on a retrofit kit.

Conclusion

I can go more on and on LS engines but till now you probably get the point that why LS engine are great stuff. But you are still hanging on Gen I small block death grip.

Not yet ready???

Just fine. Knowing that there is some better options available in the market can’t reduce the things we love.